Quote by Steve Jobs

We've demonstrated a strong track record of being very disciplined with the use of our cash. We don't let it burn a hole in our pocket, we don't allow it to motivate us to do stupid acquisitions. And so I think that we'd like to continue to keep our powder dry, because we do feel that there are one or more strategic opportunities in the future.


We've demonstrated a strong track record of being very disci

Summary

This quote emphasizes the importance of being financially responsible and not being driven to make impulsive acquisitions. The speaker highlights their disciplined approach in managing cash and their commitment to avoiding unnecessary spending. By keeping their "powder dry" (a metaphor for not exhausting their resources), they explain their intention to maintain financial flexibility. They believe this will allow them to capitalize on potential strategic opportunities that may arise in the future.

By Steve Jobs
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